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Omanba, the mercenary little thief

 

I think the very first word I heard from my dad as a child was ‘ you for look sharp’ yes, look sharp, be smart, shine your eyes. Accra we dey, life no be easy.

Daddy of course seemed like a smart guy, yes he never lost an argument with mum and the days mum tried to stand her grounds, a slap was not far from her face.

By class four, I knew school was not my   forte. I was the hen of the class always laying eggs, I had to look sharp. I had to stretch my neck like a giraffe, a little to the left and a little to the right. A little bit of this and a little bit of that. A little copying here  and a little copying there and boooooom I finally understood my dad for I had shined my eyes and looked sharp!

Mother was a staunch Christian and made sure we never missed church. I was a sharp guy and hated the boredom of Sunday school. But I learnt something extremely significant that was going to propel me towards great heights. Salvation!

I passed my BECE with flying colours because sir George’s wife’s uncle’s son worked at WAEC.

Senior high school seemed like an unending roller coaster. Oko, was my friend. We sat in the same class and slept in the same dormitory so it made perfect sense to sit next to Oko in class.   But little did I know what was to ensue in my friendship with Oko. Our very first test that term was organised by our maths teacher – Miss Trudy.

I sat confidently next to Oko smiling broadly ready to harness my well acquired skills. A little to the left and a little to the right was all I needed, and of course Oko, the “6 ones” student and my bosom friend was to my right so I stretched my neck a little to the right and before I could say jack a huge slap had landed on my face! Oko’s hand left an imprint on my face for weeks. Oko was a game changer, copy but never get  caught.

After the maths class Oko and I were sent to the staff common room to explain the incident that had occurred. At that moment communication was key and I was a great communicator. I vehemently denied any wrong doing so Oko had to bear the brunt for his unnecessary violent action!

Being a sharp guy and a great communicator I started brewing political ambitions when I got to the university. I became the SRC president and Winston was the treasurer. Winston and I were birds of the same feather.  From the SRC coffers I stole 55%of the money that belonged to students. Winston stole 40% and we gave 5% to Kofi the SRC secretary just to shut him up because he was a load mouth.

After I graduated from university i was ready to take over the whole of Ghana.

I became a politician, a lawyer, a police officer, a journalist, a bank manager, a civil servant, a pastor, etc.

This is the making of a corrupt citizen.

By Ayerkie Narnor

NB: Piece is fictional and has no connection with writer

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