Ghana has been naïve in Guantanamo ‘terror’ deal – Security analysts

Some Ghanaian security analysts have expressed shock at the decision by Ghana to accept a deal with the US government to resettle two Guantanamo Bay ‘terror’ suspects in the country.

One of the analysts, Dr. Vladimir Antwi Danso said the deal cannot be reversed if even Ghana changes its mind not to accept the suspects.

Dr. Danso who is also a lecturer at the Legon Center for International Diplomacy further questioned what the Ghanaian government considered before agreeing to the deal which has left more questions on the minds of Ghanaians and other residents in the West African country.

“Why Ghana, we ask ourselves why Ghana? These are people from Yemen who have gone to Afghanistan to fight, arrested and caged for over 10 years and now are being released… If Yemen is not conducive for their return, what about Saudi Arabia which is close by? What is in it which would inure to the benefit of Ghana?” He questioned.

Dr. Antwi Danso in May 2015 wrote an article where he raised a number of concerns cautioning African governments about this new wave where America is looking for countries to dump inmates from Guantanamo Bay.

According to him the decision is not in anyway favourable for Ghana adding that “these are hardened people who have been caged and have haboured hatred for America, do we know what they can do?

“Nowadays terrorist organisations are more cell-like, so they could stay in cell and still be working for their terrorist organisations. You can do these on your computer, money laundering, arms movement etc.

“This decision cannot be reversed and we must live with it” he concluded.

One other analyst, Emmanuel Sowatey said the Ghanaian government failed to consider its citizens before agreeing to accept the ‘package’ which he said could be problematic in the future.

He said the government should have at least mentioned the deal to the people of Ghana through parliament etc before springing such a surprise on them.

Source: 3news.com By Martin Asiedu-Dartey

]]>