Biennial World Cup ‘would make extra £3.3bn’ – Fifa

France won the last men's World Cup in Russia in 2018, with the next tournament taking place in Qatar in 2022
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A biennial World Cup would generate in excess of £3.3bn in additional revenue over a four-year cycle, delegates at Fifa’s global summit have been told.

Fifa has proposed the change as part of a revamped calendar.

All 211 member associations were invited to the summit as the debate over Arsene Wenger’s plan to double the frequency of the World Cup intensifies.

Uefa, Europe’s major leagues and South American football’s governing body Conmebol have opposed the plans.

Caf, the African governing body, has given its backing.

Delegates were told the overall financial impact on gate receipts, media rights and sponsorship revenues from a World Cup every two years would result in a predicted increase from £5.3bn for the 48-team tournament due to be held across three countries in 2026 to £8.6bn across a four-year cycle with two World Cups.

Research carried out by Nielsen Sports, a leading German-based sports measurement and analytics organisation, also says there would be no impact on revenue generated by domestic leagues or major international club competitions such as the Champions League, which they say have been growing regardless of interest in national team competitions.

The meeting was told that Fifa estimate, on average, national associations would each be allocated around £12.1m in additional funds, although the precise method of distribution was not clarified.

Wenger is determined to reduce the gap in funding between the richest and poorest countries and, in turn, increase the chances of players from the poorest nations being developed to the full extent of their talent.

A report commissioned by the World Leagues Forum in November said Fifa’s proposal could cost domestic leagues and Uefa about 8bn euros (£6.8bn) per season in lost TV rights and commercial agreements.

On Friday Uefa published a report carried out by consultancy firm Oliver & Ohlbau, which said changes to the international calendar would see revenues drop between 2.5 and 3bn euros (£2.1-2.6bn) for European national federations across a four-year cycle.

Source: BBC