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Health Alert: Police cell inmates use urine to flush toilets

Inmates at the Dansoman police cells use urine and sachet water to flush toilet due to frequent water shortage. The toilet facility in the cell is also in a deplorable state as water collects in the entire washroom area all year round.

Meanwhile, the Divisional Police Commander, ACP Atimbila, has deplored the inhuman treatment meted out to suspects in police cells.

There have been talks about the deplorable nature of police cells across the country and the conditions under which inmates live.

Even though the Dansoman division attracted corporate support in terms of renovation in the past few years, improper ventilation and other defects are still a challenge.

Some of the few small holes in the walls have been blocked by the inmates with plastic bottles for hanging their clothes. But perennial water shortage remains the biggest challenge in the cells. Inmates rely solely on stored water in a bucket for daily use.

During the rush period, the bucket stays dry for days compelling the inmates to rely on sachet water or urine to flush the toilet.

Additionally, water collects in the entire washroom making it unbearable. There is also the perceived inhuman treatment meted out to inmates by police personnel.

Addressing a special Easter feast with inmates within the Dansoman division, the divisional commander, ACP Moses Asabagna Atimbila observed that cells are only transit quarters’ in the criminal justice system capable of holding anyone and so must be kept safe.

The novelty was a way of showing love to the inmates and also seek forgiveness and reconciliatory from their hearts.

ACP Atimbila, again want the inmates repent from their wrong ways.

There are 22 inmates currently in the Dansoman cell with the longest spending one year, six days on Wednesday April 19, on remand for murder.

By 3news.com|Ghana
Twitter: @3news.com

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