by Ayerkie Narnor

March 1, 2017

Ghana, a throwback story: Toeing the Whiteman’s line

The Eurocentric form of education, politics and religion is the genesis of Africa’s problems, and Africa must realize that before the white-man strategically enforced these forms of systems on us we had our own.

Unfortunately most Africans are so out tuned with their past that they believe they had or did nothing until the Europeans arrived at their shores. So there is the frantic need to toe the line and try to catch up with our colonial masters and en-slavers.  The third world people, developing countries as Africa is referred to. But when would Africa catch up when no one is waiting on Africa?

When the rationale behind the formation of an educational system was formed for the spreading of the Gospel and creating an elite group of people to run and administer what colonial rulers had started, which is devoid of creative and innovative thinking then the future of the nation would be forever chained to its colonial past.

No wonder most of the examples in text books are base on the West. It is therefore not surprising that in a hot climate like that of Ghana architects would put up glass house design architecture without windows and when it’s light out, it becomes a funny spectacle.

A political system base solely on popularity contest because no one probes into the lives of political aspirants and incumbents to uncover who they really are, not even the media.

Also, Africa needs to stop looking up to the West for direction, as said by many  but that would mean Africa would stop looking up to God!right? After all to some Africans God is the exact image of the White-man, fair in completion, blue eyes, long blond  wavy hair and all white. Interesting, how the very first church in Ghana is right on top of a slave dungeon. It’s amazing how the omnipresent God showed Himself or Herself to a select few to introduce God to Africans through slavery.  Yet with a little probing Africans would realize that Christianity had been practiced in Africa long before colonization.

Ghana would soon turn 60 perhaps it’s time to take a second look at education, politics and religion.

By Ayerkie Narnor|3news.com|Ghana

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