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Trump takes first steps as president

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Donald Trump has taken his first steps as president, signing an executive order which targets the signature health care reforms of his predecessor.

His proclamation ordered agencies to ease the economic burden of the laws known as Obamacare.

In Friday’s inaugural address he pledged to put “America first” and to end the “American carnage” of abandoned factories and rampant crime.

Later, about 200,000 people are due to join a Women’s March in Washington.

Organisers say they want to highlight racial and gender equality and other issues perceived to be under threat from Mr Trump’s administration.

Similar marches are already taking place in Australia and New Zealand and many others are planned around the world.

BBC Washington correspondent Barbara Plett-Usher says Mr Trump has vowed to do what he can immediately using executive action, chalking up early victories before he has to turn to the grinding work of getting bills through Congress.

His team quickly overhauled the White House website to include his pledge to roll back Barack Obama’s strategy on climate change.

Shortly after taking office as the 45th US president, Mr Trump sent his Cabinet nominations to the Senate.

Trump sworn

He signed a waiver to allow retired General James Mattis to serve as defence secretary, even though he left the military less than the required seven years ago.

Gen Mattis, whose appointment has been approved by the Senate, was later sworn in by Vice-President Mike Pence.

Mr Pence also swore in John Kelly as head of Homeland Security.

The revamped White House website replaces Mr Obama’s policies with Mr Trump’s new agenda.

The new administration lists only six issues on the website – energy, foreign policy, jobs and growth, military, law enforcement and trade deals.

Critics point out that it makes no mention of civil rights, LGBT rights, healthcare or climate change.

‘A beautiful day’

One of Mr Trump’s key election pledges was to repeal and replace President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act.

Chief of Staff Reince Priebus said President Trump’s executive order was for federal departments to “minimise the economic burden”‘ of the act, but he gave no details.

Mr Trump also signed a proclamation declaring a national day of patriotism.

Asked about his first day, which was capped by a dance with First Lady Melania to My Way, Mr Trump said “it was busy but good – a beautiful day.”

In his inaugural address, Mr Trump, 70, struck a nationalist, protectionist tone.

“From this moment on, it’s going to be America First. We will follow two simple rules: Buy American and hire American,” he said.

Mr Trump accused Washington politicians of abandoning citizens to industrial decline and spiralling rates of crime.

“This American carnage stops right here and stops right now,” he said.

“Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families.”

Following the ceremony, some protesters took to the streets in Washington, smashing windows of businesses and denouncing capitalism and the new president.

Police in riot gear dispersed them using pepper spray.

More than 200 arrests were made and six officers were hurt. At least one vehicle was set on fire, police said.

Source: BBC

Jammeh

Gambia’s Yahya Jammeh says he will step down

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 Mr Jammeh had said there were irregularities in the presidential election

Mr Jammeh had said there were irregularities in the presidential election

The Gambia’s long-term leader Yahya Jammeh says he will step down, after refusing to accept defeat in elections.

In an announcement on state TV, he said it was “not necessary that a single drop of blood be shed”.

The statement followed hours of talks between Mr Jammeh and West African mediators. He gave no details of what deal might have been struck.

Mr Jammeh has led the country for 22 years but was defeated in December’s election by Adama Barrow.

Mr Barrow has been in neighbouring Senegal for days and was inaugurated as president in the Gambian embassy there on Thursday.

Troops from several West African nations, including Senegal, have been deployed in The Gambia, threatening to drive Mr Jammeh out of office if he did not agree to go.

 The new president, Adama Barrow, was sworn in in Senegal on Thursday

The new president, Adama Barrow, was sworn in in Senegal on Thursday

Mr Jammeh’s decision to quit came after talks with the presidents of Guinea and Mauritania.

“I have decided today in good conscience to relinquish the mantle of leadership of this great nation with infinite gratitude to all Gambians,” he said.

“I promise before Allah and the entire nation that all the issues we currently face will be resolved peacefully.”

Shortly before the TV address, Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz said that a deal had been struck and that Mr Jammeh would leave the country. He gave no further details.

Mr Jammeh was given an ultimatum to leave office or be forced out by UN-backed troops, which expired at 16:00 GMT on Friday.

The deadline was set by the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas), a regional grouping backed by the United Nations.

The first signs of a breakthrough came on Friday when a senior aide to the new president told the BBC’s Umaru Fofana that Mr Jammeh had agreed to step down.

Mr Jammeh had at first accepted defeat in the election but then reversed his position and said he would not step down.

He declared a 90-day state of emergency, blaming irregularities in the electoral process.

The electoral commission accepted that some of its early results had contained errors but said they would not have affected Mr Barrow’s win.

Mr Jammeh had vowed to stay in office until new elections were held.

Source: BBC

Trump sworn

President Trump pledges ‘only America first’ in fiery inaugural address

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Trump swornDonald Trump became the 45th President of the United States Friday, vowing to drain power from Washington elites and always put “America first” in its dealings with the world at a moment of transformative political change.

In a time honored ceremony on the flag-draped West Front of the Capitol, Trump placed his left hand on a family Bible and another that belonged to Abraham Lincoln and promised to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution.

As light rain began to fall on a crowd stretching toward the Washington Monument, Trump took the oath of office from Chief Justice John Roberts with the new first lady, Melania Trump, by his side.

Trump’s inaugural address centered on the themes that animated his stunning outsider campaign, which shattered political conventions and gave voice to heartland voters who felt badly let down by professional politicians.

Though he paid tribute to outgoing President Barack Obama, the new president sketched a vision of America that came across as a repudiation of the last administration. He vowed to restore the nation’s strength and purpose and to rebuild it from within, vowing to “bring back” American jobs, borders, wealth and and dreams.

“We assembled here today are issuing a new decree to be heard in every city, and in every foreign capital and in every hall of power,” Trump said. “From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land, from this day forward, it’s going to be only ‘America first! America first!'”

Trump talked of a nation of mothers and children trapped in poverty in the inner cities and “rusted out factories scattered like tombstones” and warned crime and gangs had robbed the nation of much of its potential.

“This American carnage stops right here and stops right now,” Trump said with Obama looking on.

“A new national pride will stir out souls, lift our sights and heal our divisions,” Trump said, saying that whether people are black or white they still bleed the same red blood of patriots.

And he told Americans listening to the address: “You will never be ignored again.”

Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton also attended the ceremony. Hillary Clinton, who Trump defeated in the November election, was also in the audience in a show of support for national unity and the peaceful transfer of presidential authority.

But contrary to some expectations, Trump made no gesture of reconciliation toward Clinton or her supporters following the deeply divisive campaign in which he won the Electoral College but lost the popular vote.

The swearing-in was one of many traditions that began unfolding early Friday morning. Trump and his family attended a private worship service at St. John’s Church, known as the church of presidents. The Obamas greeted Trump and the new first lady at the North Portico of the White House before hosting them for tea.

Earlier in the morning, Obama wrote a letter to Trump and left it on the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office, as outgoing presidents typically do for their successors. As Obama left the Oval Office for the final time, he was asked if he had any words for the American people. “Thank you,” Obama said.

The customs and symbolism that are playing out — from Trump’s ride to the Capitol with Obama to the First Couple’s dance at an inaugural ball — are familiar. But the circumstances of this inauguration — the 58th in the nation’s history — could hardly be more unconventional.

Everything you need to know about Trump’s inauguration, weekend protests
When the presidential primary season began nearly a year ago, few thought Trump could survive the battle for the Republican nomination — much less beat Clinton to win the presidency. He will be the oldest president sworn in for a first term and the first president with no previous diplomatic, political or military executive experience.

In what is always a poignant moment, the former President Obama and his wife left Capitol Hill on a helicopter bound for Andrews Air Force base for a farewell ceremony before taking one last flight on the presidential jet. The Obamas are heading to Palm Springs, California, for a vacation.

Trump is attending a joint congressional inaugural luncheon in the Capitol before heading back to the White House for the inaugural parade.

In the evening, Trump and the new first lady will attend two inaugural balls, part of the stripped down inaugural festivities that aides say are meant to stress that the new president is eager to get to work.

Trump’s supporters, who sent him to Washington to rip up political norms and thwart the establishment, are thrilled as he assumes power. The crowds started streaming towards the National Mall as dawn broke, with many people wearing Trump’s distinctive red “Make America Great Again” baseball caps.

Trump’s supporters, who sent him to Washington to rip up political norms and thwart the establishment, are thrilled as he assumes power.

The crowds started streaming toward the National Mall as dawn broke, with many people wearing Trump’s distinctive red “Make America Great Again” baseball caps. But millions of Americans are also anxious, owing to the abrasive tone of Trump’s campaign and fears over the consequences of his strongman leadership style.

Trump has vowed to tear up US trade deals that he says disadvantage US workers, confront a rising China and improve estranged relations with Russia, despite allegations that Moscow interfered in the election. He has set high expectations for his presidency by promising to return jobs to US shores and reviving the manufacturing industry.

He has pledged to crush ISIS and introduce tough new vetting on immigrants from countries where there is terrorist activity, raising fears of discrimination against Muslims.

He is promising to build a wall on the southern border, to crack down on undocumented migrants and to gut the financial and environmental regulations that are at the center of the Obama administration’s legacy.

New presidents typically use the inaugural address — viewed by a huge crowd fanned out on the National Mall and millions of television viewers — to issue a call for national unity and ease the wounds of divisive elections.

They typically remind Americans of the values and the history that binds them and of the nation’s historic mission.
Trump, so far, has done little to reach out to his foes since November.

“He is still talking as if he is the insurgent candidate rather than the President-elect,” said Robert Rowland, an expert on presidential rhetoric at the University of Kansas.

“Historically, presidents who are effective use inaugural addresses to heal the wounds of the campaign, to talk about what it means to be an American, to discuss shared values and lay out their political principles to come across as a strong not vain leader.”

Source CNN

Yahya Jammeh had conceded defeat via phone call to Barrow ahead of the election results declaration Friday

Gambia crisis: Jammeh misses second deadline to step down

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Yahya Jammeh had conceded defeat via phone call to Barrow ahead of the election results declaration Friday

Yahya Jammeh had conceded defeat via phone call to Barrow ahead of the election results declaration Friday

A deadline for defeated President Yahya Jammeh of The Gambia to leave office or be forced out by UN-backed forces at 16:00 GMT has expired with no news.

The earlier deadline of noon passed as the Guinean and Mauritanian presidents arrived in Banjul for last-ditch talks. There has been no statement from them.

Mr Jammeh’s elected successor, Adama Barrow, was sworn in as president at a ceremony in Senegal on Thursday.

Troops acting in support of President Barrow have paused their advance.

The forces from the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) regional grouping are backed by the United Nations.

They crossed into The Gambia from Senegal on Thursday but have been told not to advance further until the talks have finished.

Mr Barrow’s legitimacy as president has been recognised internationally, after he won last month’s elections.

Mr Jammeh remains at the state house in The Gambia’s capital, where soldiers are calm, the BBC’s Umaru Fofana reports.

The head of the Gambian army, Gen Ousman Badjie, told Reuters that he now recognises Mr Barrow as commander-in-chief.

Senegalese soldiers patrol near a camp of the Red Cross in Karang, Senegal, near the border with The Gambia, on January 20, 2017

Senegalese troops – seen here at a Red Cross camp in Senegal – are among those to have crossed into The Gambia photo: AFP

Mr Jammeh’s term expired at midnight on Wednesday – but, while still president, he engineered a parliamentary vote to extend his presidency. As Mr Barrow has already been sworn in, the country could be said to have two presidents.

Guinea’s President Alpha Conde and Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz arrived in Banjul on Friday morning for the talks with Mr Jammeh.

The chairman of the Ecowas commission, Marcel Alain de Souza, said that if the meeting with Mr Conde proved unsuccessful, military action would follow.


Break for prayers: By Umaru Fofana, BBC Africa, Banjul

Soldiers heading to Friday prayers at State House in Banjul

Soldiers attend Friday prayers at the mosque in the grounds of State House

With talks still ongoing between Yahya Jammeh and the visiting presidents of Guinea and Mauritania, I have been waiting at State House, the seat of the presidency.

When it was time for Friday prayers and as there was no sign of progress I went to the Chairman Jammeh Mosque inside the grounds of State House.

The soldiers were great. They welcomed me there and looked pleased to know I was a practising Muslim.

Imam Alhaji Jallow was preaching about faith and following the right path. An interesting theme if you ask me, in view of the times.

Midway through the sermon, we were asked to leave the four front rows. We shifted.

As the sermon proceeded I was called outside the mosque. Confused, I asked why. No answers. My colleague and I were driven out of State House. Very respectfully I must say.

As we left, a member of the presidential guard whispered to me the obvious: Mr Jammeh and his guests would be coming to the mosque for prayers.

They were perhaps worried that I would get an insight into how the talks were going if I remained.


Ecowas said that its forces had encountered no resistance after entering The Gambia.

The troops are from Senegal and other West African countries.

Mr Barrow, who remains in Senegal, has said that he will not return to Gambia’s capital, Banjul, until the military operation has ended.The threat by the West African regional bloc Ecowas to remove Mr Jammeh by force is supported by the 15-member UN Security Council, although the council has stressed that a political solution should be the priority.

A Senegalese army spokesman, Col Abdou Ndiaye, told the BBC that troops who were now in The Gambia were prepared to fight if necessary.

“It is already war, if we find any resistance, we will fight it,” he said, adding: “If there are people who are fighting for the former president, we will fight them.”

But Col Ndiaye said the main goal of Ecowas was to restore democracy and to allow the newly-elected president to take power.

Tourists have been evacuated from The Gambia and the UK’s Foreign Office has advised against all but essential travel to the West African country.

A Senegalese army spokesman, Col Abdou Ndiaye, told the BBC that troops who were now in The Gambia were prepared to fight if necessary.

“It is already war, if we find any resistance, we will fight it,” he said, adding: “If there are people who are fighting for the former president, we will fight them.”

But Col Ndiaye said the main goal of Ecowas was to restore democracy and to allow the newly-elected president to take power.

Tourists have been evacuated from The Gambia and the UK’s Foreign Office has advised against all but essential travel to the West African country.

Why is Mr Jammeh refusing to go?

Mr Jammeh has called for new elections to be held in Gambia

Mr Jammeh has called for new elections to be held in Gambia photo: REUTERS

After first accepting defeat in the election he reversed his position and said he would not step down. He declared a 90-day state of emergency, blaming irregularities in the electoral process.

The electoral commission accepted that some of its early results had contained errors but said they would not have affected Mr Barrow’s win.

Mr Jammeh has said he will stay in office until new elections are held.

Remaining in power would also give him protection against prosecution for alleged abuses committed during his rule.

Map of The Gambia

Source: BBC

donald-trump

Trump to be sworn in as US president

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Donald Trump is set to be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

The property tycoon won an unexpected victory in November’s election after a controversial campaign.

Hundreds of thousands of supporters and protesters are travelling to Washington DC for the event.

Thousands of police have been deployed and many kilometres of crowd barriers set up as part of a vast security operation.

Addressing supporters on Thursday night at a pre-inaugural concert, Mr Trump pledged to unify America, bring change and make the country great “for all of our people”.

Meanwhile in New York, thousands of people attended a rally where dozens of celebrities and politicians voiced their concerns about the president-elect.

Mr Trump will be sworn in before midday local time (17:00 GMT) by Chief Justice John Roberts, and make his inaugural speech.

The ceremony will be attended by former presidents and first ladies, including Bill Clinton and his wife Hillary, Mr Trump’s opponent in the recent election.

The only absences will be 92-year-old George Bush Senior, who is in hospital being treated for respiratory problems, and his wife Barbara.

Members of Congress will also be there, although more than 50 House Democrats have said they will boycott the event.

An estimated 800,000 to 900,000 people are travelling to Washington, although it is not clear how many are coming to celebrate the inauguration and how many to protest against it.

Demonstrations for and against Mr Trump include a rally for the new president by Bikers for Trump after the ceremony.

The Women’s March on Washington on Saturday – for racial and gender equality, and other issues perceived to be under threat from Mr Trump’s administration – is expected to draw about 200,000 people.

Source: BBC

Adama Barrow1

Gambia CDS jubilates after Barrow’s swearing-in; media blacklist inauguration

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Adama Barrow1

The Gambia Chief of Defence Staff, Ousman Badjie, joined thousands of citizens and some military personnel in jubilation on the streets of The Gambia when the news broke that President Adama Barrow has been sworn-in.

The Gambia President Adama Barrow was sworn in as president in Senegal on Thursday but the longtime ruler Yahya Jammeh, who came to power in a 1994 coup refuses to cede power.

“People were jubilating after the swearing-in. They said they want unity, democracy, good governance so that Gambia will be free”, he Editor for the Point Newspaper in The Gambia, Ousman Kargbo told Onua FM’s Yen Nsempa on Friday hosted by Bright Asempa.

He explained that currently, The Gambian soldiers have vanished from the various check points after the inauguration and when they heard the ECOWAS troops are approaching The Gambia.

They are presently not visibly seen in town but they are also maintaining some order actually. Most of them who were positioned around the country have disappeared and most of them joined the crowd in jubilating yesterday after the swearing in,” he observed.

He noted the “the Chief of Defence Staff was also jubilating with the crowd but President Jammeh is using the republican guards headed by another strong military personnel so they are with him…as I am speaking to you they are the ones retaining him”.

The Point Editor observed that those who are with Jammeh, “are also part of the state military but Mr. Jammeh have that divide and rule tactics so that at any point in time he can use them”.

Unfinished business

Mr. Ousman Kargbo said what the ECOWAS, UN and AU have done “is still an unfinished business because we heard President Barrow was going to come to Gambia any time but no specific day was mentioned”.

“President Jammeh is nowhere to be seen right now but we are of the believe that he is at the state house in Banjul but we are face with conundrum now because the state house is where President Barrow must come and stay and that is where President Jammeh is so it is an unfinished business”.

Media blackout

Media houses in The Gambia blacklisted the inauguration of the President, Adama Barrow, in Senegal for fear of being closed or attacked by forces of the ousted President, Jahya Jammeh.

Even though there were jubilations across the country when they heard that President Barrow has been sworn in at the Gambia’s embassy in Senegal, television and radio stations failed to telecast the event.

The Editor for the Point Newspaper observed that “I monitored national TV last night and nothing of Barrow’s swearing in was mentioned. The new information Minister appointed by President Barrow is adamant to talk because Jammeh is in power and is in control of the government media”. He said last night, nothing was said or announced on President Barrow. It was all what they want Jammeh to hear”.

Mr. Kporgba added that “President Jammeh has shut down three major radio stations so there was no coverage. The rest were afraid to cover. The print media cannot work and the whole nation was state of fear”.

“We have only one TV station and this is controlled by the state and we have some radio stations but they have been shut down by President Jammeh and none of the print media was able to carry any report today on the swearing-in”, Mr. Kporgba observed.

The Editor said “the only paper which publishes against the opposition is working but the only newspaper the people rely on is the Point where I work and other newspaper own by the opposition but none of these papers have carried any story yet on the swearing-in”.

Business activities

Kporgba said “Adama Barrow is not operational yet so Jammeh is in charge now and right now, the whole nation has broken down. No official duties. Businesses, banks are closed and people are indoors except some of us who go out to find out what is going on”.

He said “as I am talking to you, the nation is going on without any official function”

Foreign troops

He confirmed that “foreign troops are in Gambia now and that is why after the inauguration, people jubilated but around 7pm people went indoors and as I am talking to you, people are still indoors looking for what will happen”.

He added “images I have indicates huge armoured cars in town and they are about to enter into Banjul”.

By Kweku Antwi-Otoo|Onua 95.1FM|3news.com

The new president, Adama Barrow, was sworn in in Senegal on Thursday

Gambia’s new president Adama Barrow grateful to John Mahama at swearing-in

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Adama Barrow2

Adama Barrow (in white) was sworn in at the Gambian embassy in Senegal on Thursday

The Gambia’s new leader, Adama Barrow, has expressed gratitude to West African leaders who were solidly behind his nation in the throes of political instability.

He mentioned Ghana’s former president, John Dramani Mahama, as one of the leaders who helped to stabilize the situation in his country.

Mr Barrow, a real estate contractor, beat long-serving leader Yahya Jammeh at the polls on December 1, 2016.

After initially calling Mr Barrow to concede defeat, Mr Jammeh, who has ruled The Gambia for 22 years, rejected the results and asked the independent electoral body to conduct fresh elections.

Efforts by some West African leaders to talk Mr Jammeh out of such a move proved futile.

The Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) appointed Ghana’s John Dramani Mahama and Nigeria’s Muhammadu Buhari as mediators.

But two days to the expiration of his tenure, Mr Jammeh declared a 90-day state of emergency backed by The Gambia’s legislative.

READ: Jammeh declares state of emergency in The Gambia

SEE ALSO: Mahama in The Gambia again as Jammeh refuses to step down

Ecowas, however, was bent to swear in Mr Barrow as the de jure president of the West African nation.

On Thursday, Mr Barrow was sworn in at the Gambian embassy in neighbouring Senegal.

“As of today, I am the president of Gambia whether you voted for me or not,” he said.

He promised better working conditions for the people of The Gambia.

Among the dignitaries present was the Special Representative of the UN Secretary General and Head of the United Nations Office for West Africa (UNOWA), Dr Mohamed Ibn Chambas.

“I must also express profound gratitude to [West African leaders] and the [UN] Security Council…who stood during our time of critical state.”

The new president described his victory as one for the Gambian nation.

“The capacity to offer change through the ballot box has proven the power of the Gambian people.”

Mr Barrow is expected to be escorted by a joint sub-regional security force to Banjul as the new leader of the Gambia, where former president Jammeh still resides.

READ: Ghana deploys troops to support Ecowas mission in The Gambia

By Emmanuel Kwame Amoh|3news.com|Ghana

Adama Barrow1

New Gambia president to be sworn in at Dakar embassy

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Barrow is sure of being sworn in on Thursday

Barrow will be sworn in at the Gambian embassy in Dakar

Newly elected president of The Gambia Adama Barrow will be sworn in at the nation’s embassy in neighbouring Senegal.

The ceremony will be held on Thursday, January 19 after the presidential tenure of long-serving leader Yahya Jammeh ended on Wednesday, January 18.

There has been confusion over the investiture of Mr Barrow after outgoing Jammeh declared a 90-day state of emergency and getting parliamentary approval to reign till after that period.

He has also challenged election results that declared his opponent winner.

Efforts by subregional leaders to get Mr Jammeh to peacefully relinquish power have proven futile.

ECOWAS delegation were in the Gambia to persuade Jammeh to step down

ECOWAS delegation was in the Gambia to persuade Jammeh to step down

He has not budged to any of the mediation led by Nigeria’s General Muhammadu Buhari and Ghana’s ex-leader John Mahama to step down.

On Thursday, Mr Barrow, who has been in Senegal since Sunday, January 15, confirmed on his official Twitter page that he will have his investiture in the Francophone country.

Streets of Banjul were deserted ahead of the inauguration day as reports of an Ecowas invasion spread across the country.

Residents fled to Senegal while tourists were also flown out by their countries.

It is unclear what Mr Jammeh will do next after Mr Barrow assumes the role as the de jure president of The Gambia.

By Emmanuel Kwame Amoh|3news.com|Ghana

Gambian forces stormed the IEC offices on Tuesday

‘Scary calm’ takes over The Gambia – journalist

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Gambian forces stormed the IEC offices on Tuesday

The Editor of the Point Newspaper in The Gambia has described the situation in the Gambia as a “scary calm”.

Osman Kadbo said “everybody is indoors and it is difficult situation now”.

Speaking from the capital, Banjul, Osman told Accra-based Onua FM’s Yen Nsempa hosted by Bright Asempa on Thursday, “We are all afraid and we are waiting to see what will happen from today.”

The Gambian President Yahya Jammeh is refusing to step down despite the threat of military intervention by neighbouring states.

Adama Barrow, who beat him in elections last month, is due to be inaugurated as the new president on Thursday, but Mr Jammeh has ignored all overtures as well as ECOWAS deadline to step down.

Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz failed to break the deadlock at last-minute talks with Mr Jammeh.

Meanwhile, West African military forces are on standby to enforce a transfer of power.

Osman noted that “we are expecting the President to be sworn in today but that is not likely to happen because everybody is indoors.”

“We have assigned reporters to cover the event but no one knows where it is taking place. Initially, it was to take place at the Independence Avenue where it can contain thousands of people but nothing is happening there”, the Editor added.

Citizens leaving  

On the issue that most citizens and foreigners have left, and keep moving out of the country, Osman said “the climate is not conducive for any activities so a lot of people have left the country. Some nationals from Nigeria, Ghana, Senegal and others have also left”.

Announcements

He added that “last night at between 7pm to 10pm, there were announcements on TV and radio in both English and local languages that they came to assure the people that there will be peace so the people should go on with their activities. It was last night but it has caused a lot of fear in the people and they are indoors now”.

By Kweku Antwi-Otoo|Onua 95.1FM|3news.com

The military says it will be on standby to stop any violence that may arise

Ghana deploys troops to support Ecowas mission in The Gambia

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akufo-addo-guard

President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo has approved and authorized the deployment of a combat team of 205 Ghanaian soldiers to The Gambia to join the Ecowas force.

The Economic Community of West African States, Ecowas, has agreed to provide security as President-elect Adama Barrow is sworn in on Thursday, January 19 as President of the Islamic Republic of The Gambia.

President Yahya Jammeh, who lost the December 1 elections, had refused to step down though initially accepting defeat.

READ: Gambian president Yahya Jammeh ‘concedes defeat’

SEE ALSO: Gambian leader rejects election results

Ecowas’ decision to send troops to The Gambia is to enforce the will of the people.

Two mediators including Former President John Dramani Mahama were tasked to ensure that there is a smooth transition of power in the West African state.

Some West African leaders attempted to convince President Jammeh to step down

Some West African leaders attempted to convince President Jammeh to step down

In a statement from the seat of Ghana’s government, President Akufo-Addo, who is also Commander-in-Chief of the Ghana Armed Forces, says the troops to The Gambia will be backed with “appropriate logistical equipment”.

“The objective is to create an enabling environment for the effective enforcement of the rule of law, and, in accordance with the Constitution of The Gambia, facilitate the inauguration of the President-Elect, Adama Barrow, on Thursday, January 19, 2017.”

The term of Yahya Jammeh, who has reigned for 22 years, officially ended on Wednesday, January 18.

He had declared a 90-day state of emergency prior to the expiry of his term.

By Emmanuel Kwame Amoh|3news.com|Ghana